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Discussing Design in 2020


This post just features some of the events that I have participated in over year, which are listed in reverse chronological order. Please note that these are all virtual sessions and that there is a mix of public conferences and invitation-only.

I would like to express my gratitude to everyone involved and would also like to highlight that the unsung hard work and passion of those making things happen behind the scenes should not go unnoticed.

While the scale of 2020’s volatile conditions happens to deliver unprecedented challenges, we should not loose sight of the many excellent examples of resolve, entrepreneurship and goodwill across the board.

I am thankful for these opportunities. All participants’ willingness to share insights and wisdom not only makes a difference, but also furthers progress in everyone’s best interest. Admittedly, I also regret having declined some other invitations due to scheduling conflicts, and hope that there will be other opportunities to cross paths in the near future.


Nokia PDC 2020 is open to Nokia Employees at the Chicago Technology Center.

Open to Illinois Institute of Technology students.



Invitation Only Webinar.

Nokia Software’s Venture Studio – Summer Internship Program 2020


Welcome to the Venture Studio’s 2020 Summer Internship Program. We have made our job to deliver Quality eXperiences by Design (QXbD) and to deliver innovate technological solutions in the process.

Our work intersects Human Centered Design (HCD), Behavioral Economics, and Human Factors Engineering (HFE). The outcome is game changing Human-Machine-Systems (HMS) that excel at best equpping users and organizations to succeed in complex operational environments.

We believe that diversity of thought fuels innovation: our internship program involves an interdisciplinary team working side by side with seasoned experts to invent the future today.

An open and curious mind, creative problem solving coupled with mental toughness, on the job learning, passion for craftmanship and, above all, “making tech human” define our culture and shape what we produce together.


Apply here: Nokia Careers


2020 SUMMER INTERNSHIP BRIEF:

About Nokia: https://www.nokia.com/about-us/what-we-do/

Site: Nokia CTC, Chicago Technology Center

Address: 2000 Lucent Lane, Naperville, IL 60563, United States

Work environment: See Venture Studio photo album and review our HFE Manifesto – we shape technology to serve the human journey

Culture & Workstyle: fluid and interdisciplinary teamwork that challenges preconceptions and fosters experimentation; a work ethic that ecompases integrity, respect, and strives for high performance outcomes

Dates: June 1st thru August 7th (10 weeks)

Application deadline: April 1st (online form, portfolio and resume)

Work hours: Monday thru Friday (business hours)

Travel: field research can involve domestic travel in the US

Compensation: biweekly wages based on hourly rates + overtime

Relocation support: lump sum available under certain conditions

Equipment: MacBook Pro + productivity, communications and design software provided for the duration of the intership

Project context: The following two videos featuring industry analsysts provide background information for this year’s internship projects.


Apply here: Nokia Careers


Did you know…

  1. Given our midcontinent location and fiber concentration, a large percentage of the country’s internet traffic is running through the Chicago area.
  2. Some of the world’s largest data centers are also located here as a result.
  3. Chicagoland is home of prestigious National Labs: Fermilab and Argonne.
  4. Argonne is building the most powerful supercomputer center in the world.
  5. One of Chicago’s 100+ start-up incubators and accelerators, 1871, has become the world’s #1.
  6. Chicago is also one of four cities with three tier-1 research universities and plenty of good talent coming out of a number of well known colleges.
  7. O’Hare is the most connected airport in the U.S.
  8. The Chicago area is home base for 35+ of Fortune 500 companies.
  9. The Midwest compares to California not only in population size, but also in the number of patents, which makes Illinois, jointly with Minnesota, Ohio and Michigan, a global innovation leader.
  10. Nokia Software’s Venture Studio is also based here : )

Last but not least… Naperville is featured as one of the ‘Best Cities to Raise a Family in America’ and ‘Best Cities to Live in America’ . Naperville achieved the No. 1 and No 2 respectively. Naperville also came out on top in the lists of ‘Cities with the Best Public Schools in America’ and ‘Safest Cities in America.’ – Chicago Tribune.


Nokia Corporation is a Fortune Global 500 and a multinational communications and information technology enterprise founded in 1865. There are in excess of 100,000 Nokians worldwide working on a wide variety of leading edge technologies.

Nokia Bell Labs involves some of the industry’s best and brightest minds working on game changing innovations. We are headquartered in Espoo, Finland and are a public limited-liability company listed on the Nasdaq Helsinki, Euronext Paris and New York Stock Exchange.


Apply here: Nokia Careers


Nokia Studio @ Service Design 2019 – Chicago, October 2019



“This year, we not only explore deeper clarity as to the definition of Service Design but take a step back and evaluate what differentiates Service Design, areas of priority, and aspects that remain continuous across all avenues of HCD, human-centered design.”


Full house at Service Design Week 2019

“While the focus will be the native principles of Service Design—backstage players, service strategy, blueprinting, co-creation, customer centricity—we also acknowledge a singular definition may not be appropriate as the market transforms.” 

“The more interesting pieces of Service Design include the narrative as organizations evolve in the experience economy, heavily reflected in our theme: Vision to Transformation.”

From first hearing about this “HCD thing” to garnering buy-in and quick wins, scaling, getting C-Suite support, redesigning services & infrastructure, and design transformation all the way to the goal of futures design.”



Reviewed on Sunday, October 20, 2019.

Desing & Innovation Advisory Board.

Thankful and proud to be part of the Design & Innovation Board, a think tank supporting the following conference series: Design Thinking, Digital Product by Design, Experience Design and Service Design, which have become premiere events for those passionate about know-how sharing, quality design and networking.



Early small success or lengthier big bang?

Service Design 2019 took place this week in Chicago. I facilitated a session on how to spot design intervention opportunities for the purpose of lining up early wins as proof points that demonstrate the value of good design.



See my faciliation deck above in the embeded SlideShare. Note that the visuals are not necessarily self-explanatory. They were crafted as the backdrop for our discussions.

In any case, I am happy to re-engage to further discuss. Please feel free to follow up on LinkedIn. We can schedule calls or just meet if we happen to be in the same area.

We explored how to scout and identify opportunities for early-small-wins, and how to purposely convert those into success stories: tactical building blocks that generate traction and momentum across organizations. That is also known as the “string of small pearls” strategy.

The end goal is to roll them up to build the case for Service Design. Each one alone might not be significant enough to suffice. But, in aggregate, they define a pattern that would amount to compelling evidence.

The chain reaction can activate a larger movement down the road. This is an agile and scalable path, which is different from confronting a “big bang” approach from the get go.

Scenario planning around how the “string of small pearls” and the “big bang” would play out (and which one applies) takes an understanding of market conditions, sought-after outcomes, resource levels, organizational behaviors and strategic thinking.



Let’s follow up.

Once again, thanks to those of you joining and actively participating in my session. I am also grateful for all of the positive and encouraging feedback that followed, which keeps one motivated to be further involved.

I would also take this chance to acknowledge the hallway discussions and this week’s messages over LinkedIn, which I will take the time to address as soon as possible.



Design and Innovation.

Marisa White, Principal Analyst for Design & Innovation, kicked off the conference by making us think about the degree to which “design” has become the new word for “innovation.”

That thought also leads to the difference between incremental and breakthrough innovations. The former delivers a performance improvement that is anchored by a known paradigm and benchmark, e.g. something just got significantly better.

The later entails a game-changing paradigm brought about by true new capabilities, e.g. “I-didn’t-know-I-could-do-that.” Good design can evoke either or both effects.


Raising beyond customer satisfaction.

In any case, as Vince Kadlubek, Meow Wolf CEO, put it in his thought provoking keynote, there is a need for exploring experiences that go from…

… (a) the expected “satisfaction” level that comes from dealing with “the familiar” and by operating whthin one’s comfort zone, core competency, or under what you would come to expect…

… to superior satisfaction surfacing as (b) the sort of “delight” that participatory empowerment, personalization, excitement, and going beyond the obvious deliver while invoking the unexpected.

Surprise-factors (or X-factors) and purposeful “wow-effects” happen to be part of the design mix in the appropriate size and context. Emotional Intelligence (affectivity value, behavioral response and engagement levels being some examples) becomes part of the basket of things making Human Centered Design different from other professional disciplines also involved in design matters.

This is not an endorsement of the capricious, smoke-&-mirrors, whimsical, vaporware, hype, bells and whistles, and/or pretentious shiny objects… but the realization that effective design integrates cognition and emotion to better serve, engage and delight.


Thanks.

Last but not least, there is a need for acknowledging the long road, good work and efforts of the Service Design 2019 team for what turned out to be an excellent conference. Thanks again to: Marisa White, Principal Analyst; Max Ribitzky, VP Partnerships; Aubrey Wells, Partnerships Director; Montana Byrd, Senior Event Coordinator; Michael Mechaly, Audience Development Manager; and Regina Vargas, Marketing Associate.