Design Camp @ IIT Institute of Design


IIT Design Camp

Each year IIT Institute of Design (ID) hosts Design Camp, a four-day immersion into the design process for working professionals across industries. Using a real-world challenge facing a Chicagoland nonprofit, ID faculty teach problem framing, user research, analysis, concept generation, prototyping, and design communication.

Learn new ways to generate insights and effective approaches for tackling the issues you and your organization encounter.


July 15–18, 2018     08:00 AM – 05:00 PM


IIT Institute of Design    3137 South Federal Street     Chicago, IL 60616


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IEEE CQR 2019: 5G in Context


IEEE CQR 2019 Banner


 

ComSoc CQR 2019 – @ieeecqr #cqr2019


I would first like to thank IEEE CQR , Communications Quality & Reliability, and all participants attending this year’s event for the opportunity to chair the conference’s opening session, which focused on 5G capabilities in the areas of small-cell densification, millimeter wave backhauling, and end-to-end security in multivendor environments.

I am also glad about having joined a second executive panel discussion (also on 5G) as one of three speakers, sharing the stage with Verizon’s Abby Knowles, VP of Network & Technology, and Deutsche Telekom – MobileedgeX‘s Geoff Hollingworth, Chief Marketing Officer.


IEEE CQR 2019 Twitter Feed.jpg


This was my 6th IEEE CQR conference since 2012, which I first attended as speaker for a Distinguished Expert panel discussion led by IIT’s Carol Davids, Director of the Real Time Communications Lab at the School of Applied Technology. Seven years have passed since that early engagement, which makes one reflect on what Communications and Quality entail in this year’s context.

This time around, in my opening remarks I outlined the nature of today’s human-to-human, machine-to-machine and human-machine communications. I also referred to Juran’s classic, “Quality by Design,” and his reference to Big Q and Little Q: the former refers to quality as value in the context of the user experience, while the later focuses on industrialization quality… conformance to standards just being “one of the many means to that end,” but not only.


From a Design Thinking perspective, the quality of 5G’s Human Experience is coupled with Technical Feasibility and Business Viability. Delivering quality experiences that make a substantial difference (when compared to either alternative and/or earlier generations of mobile technologies) becomes a top and critical success factor.

This is true across consumer and enterprise markets. And we shouldn’t forget the need for taking down the digital divide: gaps in digital literacy become inequalities undermining our communities’ prosperity and quality of life.


5G’s Technical Feasibility goes beyond radio technologies to include: data science, cloud systems, virtualization, software defined tools & systems, and distributed architectures that entail microservices… as well as centralization optimizing for cost efficiencies and distributed edge resources optimizing for effective service delivery… just to name some of the technical matters under consideration in 5G’s ecosystem.


5G’s Business Viability calls for new business models that reshape and transform the value chain in users’ best interest… so that 5G can actually thrive. That undoubtedly prompts more attention to Human Centered Design (HCD) in telecoms, this being the very same sector that pioneered Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in industry and coined “Designing for People” all the way back in the mid 1940s.


IEEE CQR Session ChairLast but not least, I need to express my appreciation to segment and session chairs Bob Lesnewich and Kelly Krick for all of their support and tireless work before and during the conference.

Thanks to Chris Mayer, Technical Committee Vice Chair,  Jason Boswell and Pasi Hurri, conference co-chairs. The talent and experience that IEEE CQR manages to rally makes this be a premier industry event year after year.

IEEE CommSoc CQR 2019 – @ieeecqr #cqr2019


 

Design Thinking 2019 Interview – Part 3


Design Thinking 2019 Keynote

KEYNOTE @ Design Thinking 2019  #DesignThinking2019


FULL LENGTH TRANSCRIPT VERSION


What are your biggest Design Thinking/Human Centered Design related priorities?


To address this last question, I would like to start with a quick recap a panel discussion, which I was involved in a recent engineering conference.

We should first run a sanity check and ask ourselves and those who we work and collaborate with: if we  are not prioritizing Human Factors in design… who are we ultimately designing for?

If the immediate answer is not about optimizing for the human experience, then let’s think through our other options: robot overlords? the zombie uprising? an alien invasion? Admittedly, it took the audience just a little while to process the underlying humor. I must confess that being thought-provoking by playing the contrarian card can be a challenging exercise in a public setting.


Wikimedia Commons


In any case, there is a need for identifying unnecessary risks behind the so-called “if you build it, they will come” approach, which can promote technical prowess alone at the expense of human-centered design considerations, and compromise the overall project.

The negative impact of a techno-centric only strategy can manifest itself as: (a) mounting technical debt due to unforeseen usability impairments, (b) re-work, latency and hidden costs, and (c) the sort of opportunity costs in project financials and resource allocation that can deny the implementation of alternative user-friendly options.


Stage-setting and rhetorical questions aside… the business value of design is directly correlated to how we diligently design Quality considerations into any offerings.

This is not just about “left-shifting” practices and procedures to prevent “back-end loaded” issues. It does require institutionalizing Design at the front-end… and throughout the process.


Juran on Quality by DesignBack in the early 1990s, J.M. Juran’s classic, Quality by Design, discussed two angles: a product’s better value and freedom from deficiencies, as well as the degree to which “fitness for use” could be the quality principle connecting them both.

He also made the point about misalignment between product design and the underlying operations & business processes over the product’s lifecycle.

Three decades have gone by and Design-to-Value and Operational Excellence go hand by hand. Most importantly, Design Thinking places the emphasis on “empathy,” which is how we, on the business side, learn and also “experience” what matters to users and stakholders.

In Nokia’s context, Quality Experiences are enabled by capable technologies (e.g. Design Thinking’s technical feasibility) and business model viability.


Nokia at MWC 2019


One of my priorities is to further the scope of Nokia’s QXbD, Quality Experiences by Design. That goal specifically addresses “UseCaseAbility” in a collaborative fashion to craft optimal superior offerings, OSO.

QXbD embraces the qualitative and quantitative nature of the following four dimensions applied to the front and back-end environment continuum over the lifecycle:

  • usefulness and effectiveness
  • utility, consumability and efficiency
  • usability, adaptability and lifelong accessibility
  • affectivity (desirability, adoption, delight, loyalty)

Settling for good-enough and table-stakes customer satisfaction is deemed sub-optimal. And, therefore, design efforts are sized, adequately equipped and optimized to succeed.


Design Thinking 2019 Intevew – Part 1

Design Thinking 2019 Interview – Part 2


Design Thinking 2019  #DesignThinking2019