Tagged: Design Thinking 2019

Design Thinking 2019 Interview – Part 3


Design Thinking 2019 Keynote

KEYNOTE @ Design Thinking 2019  #DesignThinking2019


FULL LENGTH TRANSCRIPT VERSION


What are your biggest Design Thinking/Human Centered Design related priorities?


To address this last question, I would like to start with a quick recap a panel discussion, which I was involved in a recent engineering conference.

We should first run a sanity check and ask ourselves and those who we work and collaborate with: if we  are not prioritizing Human Factors in design… who are we ultimately designing for?

If the immediate answer is not about optimizing for the human experience, then let’s think through our other options: robot overlords? the zombie uprising? an alien invasion? Admittedly, it took the audience just a little while to process the underlying humor. I must confess that being thought-provoking by playing the contrarian card can be a challenging exercise in a public setting.


Wikimedia Commons


In any case, there is a need for identifying unnecessary risks behind the so-called “if you build it, they will come” approach, which can promote technical prowess alone at the expense of human-centered design considerations, and compromise the overall project.

The negative impact of a techno-centric only strategy can manifest itself as: (a) mounting technical debt due to unforeseen usability impairments, (b) re-work, latency and hidden costs, and (c) the sort of opportunity costs in project financials and resource allocation that can deny the implementation of alternative user-friendly options.


Stage-setting and rhetorical questions aside… the business value of design is directly correlated to how we diligently design Quality considerations into any offerings.

This is not just about “left-shifting” practices and procedures to prevent “back-end loaded” issues. It does require institutionalizing Design at the front-end… and throughout the process.


Juran on Quality by DesignBack in the early 1990s, J.M. Juran’s classic, Quality by Design, discussed two angles: a product’s better value and freedom from deficiencies, as well as the degree to which “fitness for use” could be the quality principle connecting them both.

He also made the point about misalignment between product design and the underlying operations & business processes over the product’s lifecycle.

Three decades have gone by and Design-to-Value and Operational Excellence go hand by hand. Most importantly, Design Thinking places the emphasis on “empathy,” which is how we, on the business side, learn and also “experience” what matters to users and stakholders.

In Nokia’s context, Quality Experiences are enabled by capable technologies (e.g. Design Thinking’s technical feasibility) and business model viability.


Nokia at MWC 2019


One of my priorities is to further the scope of Nokia’s QXbD, Quality Experiences by Design. That goal specifically addresses “UseCaseAbility” in a collaborative fashion to craft optimal superior offerings, OSO.

QXbD embraces the qualitative and quantitative nature of the following four dimensions applied to the front and back-end environment continuum over the lifecycle:

  • usefulness and effectiveness
  • utility, consumability and efficiency
  • usability, adaptability and lifelong accessibility
  • affectivity (desirability, adoption, delight, loyalty)

Settling for good-enough and table-stakes customer satisfaction is deemed sub-optimal. And, therefore, design efforts are sized, adequately equipped and optimized to succeed.


Design Thinking 2019 Intevew – Part 1

Design Thinking 2019 Interview – Part 2


Design Thinking 2019  #DesignThinking2019