Tagged: Human Systems Integration

Design Thinking 2019 Interview – Part 2


Design Thinking 2019 Blog Banne

Design Thinking 2019  #DesignThinking2019


FULL LENGTH TRANSCRIPT VERSION


Design Thinking 2019 - Logo

How would you define your organization’s maturity to Design Thinking?


Nokia Corporation


cropped-Jose-de-Francisco-LinkedIn-3Nokia is a Fortune’s Global 500 corporation headquartered in Finland, which involves in excess of 100,000 employees worldwide. Most of us joined the company in recent years… which I think is nothing short from fascinating.

Nowadays, Nokia is a top B2B player in large scale digital communication technologies. Most specifically: 5G, Internet of Things, Cloud and Software just to list some well-known examples.

R. Siilasmaa’s recent book, “Transforming Nokia,” discusses what it took to pull off the company’s dramatic recovery in the past few years, while noting that this is not the first time that we reinvent ourselves since 1865. His leadership style is characterized by “Paranoid Optimism,” which I’d like to discuss in context later on.


Nokia Studio 3


At Nokia Studio we intertwine disciplines such as Data Visualization, Cybernetics and Behavioral Economics to design state of the art Decision Support Systems for next-generation digital services. These are Human-Machine-Systems (HMS.)

Given our focus on game changing innovations, Human-Centered-Design (HCD) happens to be a critical success factor at all stages in the iterative exploration, definition, introduction and broader diffusion of emerging and next generation technologies Design Thinking’s desirability, technical feasibility and business viability are, therefore, well understood critical success factors.


Nokia Studio 4


The Studio’s research addresses how to clearly articulate early desirability coupled with market-pull & outside-in strategies.  Thinking through the business value of design signals the need for removing friction from a B2B journey that involves formal contractual acceptance as the accounting trigger behind revenue recognition.

Geoffrey A. Moore’s classic, “Crossing the Chasm,” and Clayton M. Christensen’s best-seller “The Innovator’s Dilemma” make all of us mindful of the need for addressing the journey between early adopters (FOA, first office application, in the telecoms sector) and adequately scaling in the marketplace.

This means expanding across segments and industries to leverage economies of scale and, therefore, continuous improvement and innovation. Following that train of thought, consistently and predictably delivering superior satisfaction levels in the form of customer delight becomes a decisive and sustainable competitive advantage.


Nokia Studio 5


Our Studio is engaged in large, sophisticated and fluid projects that involve inter-domain undertakings. Successful cross-pollination intersects three dimensions:

  • going wide across domains to take down silos and deep on a domain basis to best leverage our know-how
  • tightly or loosely coupled integration in the value-chain / supply-chain ecosystem
  • in-house and external collaboration in alignment with the above

While purposely implied by the naming, it is worth highlighting that our home-grown QXbD, Quality Experiences by Design, methodology zeroes in on delivering meaningful, differentiated and measurable quality outcomes that are tangible to our customers.

Nokia QXbD has been conceived as a meta-discipline that can be deconstructed and re-shaped on a project and sought-after outcomes basis. We can, therefore, not just start agile but also remain truly lean to effectively get the job done.


Transforming NokiaAs introduced early on, Risto’s Transforming Nokia, discusses the impact of “Paranoid Optimism” which is also explicitly captured in the book’s subtitle. Tactically speaking, that means: leveraging the hindsight that comes from analyzing lessons learned, the thought process that leads to both obvious and hidden insights, as well as applying creative tensions and foresight to flush-out not just one single path forward, but alternative different scenarios for consideration.

In that context, Optimism in design fosters the pursuit of an ambitious game changing scenario. Being purposely Paranoid involves the sort of predictive and responsive monitoring that prompts and guides necessary reality checks and course corrections… and even pivoting in a timely fashion. This acknowledges the ripple effects and moving targets that arise when innovating and/or transforming which, when ignored, can derail any well-intended transformation effort.


Nokia at Mobile World Congress 2019


Interestingly enough, Jim Collins’ painstaking research behind “Great by Choice” outlined that Productive Paranoia is a critical success factor. He exemplifies companies that have consistently delivered 10x results by outperforming competitors in bull and bear market conditions. Jim defines Productive Paranoia as a must-have business obsession, where contingency planning and risk mitigation are of the essence.


Paul Romer, World Bank Chief Economist and last year’s Nobel laureate, makes the case for Conditional Optimism and innovation being the outcome of the marketplace’s “discovery machine.” He differentiates between complacent and conditional optimism.

The complacent kind relies on deploying hard work to make things happen, and keep iterating, while hoping for the best by setting things in motion… also described as blind optimism. Conditional Optimism focuses on proactively finding solutions to problems, and closely monitoring outcomes thru the transformation journey.


Long story short… in Nokia’s context, Design Thinking maturity can be measured by our optimism as we strive to deliver state of the art technologies that augment and expand human possibilities, coupled with paranoid and creative tensions as we purposely obsess with delivering quality experiences.


Design Thinking 2019  #DesignThinking2019

 

Nokia Studio: Summer Internship 2019


Apply here: NOKIA JOBS – SUMMER INTERNSHIP


Nokia Corporation is a Fortune Global 500 and a multinational communications and information technology enterprise founded in 1865. There are in excess of 100,000 Nokians worldwide working on a wide variety of leading edge technologies. Nokia Bell Labs involves some of the industry’s best and brightest minds working on game changing innovations. We are headquartered in Espoo, Finland and are a public limited-liability company listed on the Nasdaq Helsinki, Euronext Paris and New York Stock Exchange.


Interns at the Nokia Studio will undertake a variety of human centered research and hands-on design responsibilities for an ongoing commercial and high impact industry project in the Mission Control and Operations Center sector with the support of a Senior Creative Director.


Nokia Studio 4

Entrepreneurial initiative, teamwork, communication and presentation skills are key to a successful internship experience, which entails interaction with other interns and senior leaders at Nokia Software and Bell Labs.


Nokia Studio 1

Given the cross-functional nature and scope of work this position also involves:

– Interaction with other global functions and departments.

– Gathering, analyzing and synthesizing information.

– Participating in regular meetings.


Nokia Studio 2

QUALIFICATIONS: Currently pursuing undergraduate and graduate students in Design, Engineering or Business with relevant course work on “any” of the following disciplines:

  • Design Thinking
  • Design Strategy
  • User Research
  • Industrial Anthropology
  • Industry Research
  • Market Research
  • Business Intelligence & Analytics
  • Business Process Mapping
  • Behavioral Economics
  • Business Model Innovation
  • Process Mining with Machine Learning
  • Recommender Systems
  • Service Design
  • Systems Engineering
  • Statistical Quality Control
  • Cybernetics
  • Creative Technology – Prototype Development
  • Low Code Platforms – Visual Programming
  • Graphical User Interface Design
  • Data Visualization
  • Infographics
  • Digital Interaction Design
  • Human-Computer-Interaction
  • Human Factors Engineering
  • Human Systems Integration
  • Human in the Loop Computing
  • Human Dynamics
  • Affective Computing

Knowledge of Microsoft Office 365, Adobe Creative Cloud, or equivalent productivity and design tools preferred.


Nokia Studio 3.jpg

  • Location – NOKIA CTC, Chicago Technology Center – Naperville Campus
  • Duration – full time 10 week program
  • Dates – starting on June 3th, ending August 9th
  • Salary – based on hourly rates
  • Relocation – one time lump sum, certain conditions apply
  • Business expenses covered – new state of the art equipment and field research trips, which can include traveling to other states and customer facing activities

Nokia Studio 5

Apply here:

NOKIA JOBS – SUMMER INTERNSHIP

Nokia is a global leader in the technologies that connect people and things. With state-of-the-art software, hardware and services for any type of network, Nokia is uniquely positioned to help communication service providers, governments, and large enterprises deliver on the promise of 5G, the Cloud and the Internet of Things.

Serving customers in over 100 countries, our research scientists and engineers continue to invent and accelerate new technologies that will increasingly transform the way people and things communicate and connect.

Nokia is an equal opportunity employer that is committed to diversity and inclusion.

At Nokia, employment decisions are made regardless of race, color, national or ethnic origin, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, disability, protected veteran status or other characteristics protected by law.


Nokia Studio 6


Did you know?

  1. Much of the country’s internet traffic is running through the Chicago area.
  2. Some of the world’s largest data centers are also located here as a result.
  3. Chicagoland is home of prestigious National Labs: Fermilab and Argonne.
  4. Argonne is building the most powerful supercomputers in the world.
  5. One of Chicago’s 20+ start-up incubators, 1871, has become the world’s #1.
  6. And there is plenty of good talent coming out of well known universities.

Besides… the Midwest compares to California not only in population size, but also in the number of patents, which makes Illinois, jointly with Minnesota, Ohio and Michigan, a global innovation leader.

Last but not least… Naperville is featured as one of the ‘Best Cities to Raise a Family in America’ and ‘Best Cities to Live in America’ for 2018. Naperville achieved the No. 1 and No 2 respectively. Naperville also came out on top in the lists of ‘Cities with the Best Public Schools in America’ and ‘Safest Cities in America.’ – Chicago Tribune.


NOKIA CTC, Chicago Technology Center – Naperville Campus

2000 Lucent Lane. Naperville, IL 60563

NOKIA JOBS – SUMMER INTERNSHIP

 

The Impact of Groupthink in Decision Systems


NASA 0


“Together with his identical twin brother, Scott, he has laid the groundwork for the future of space exploration as the subjects of an unprecedented NASA study on how space affects the human body, which is featured in Scott’s New York Times best-selling memoir, Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery.”

“Currently, Mark is on the Commercial Crew Safety Board at Space X […] and is the co-founder of World View, a full-service commercial space launch provider.”

Endeavour to Succeed. College of DuPage, Department of Physics. February 14 2019.


NASA 6


I managed to attend Captain Mark Kelly’s talk in Chicago just the day before I was leaving for Barcelona’s Mobile World Congress. M. Kelly’s presence and insightful remarks commanded both admiration and utmost respect.

Among many other fascinating topics, he discussed NASA’s None of US is as Dumb as All of Us as a reminder of the negative impact of ‘groupthink‘ in the context of faulty decision making. Most specifically, he referred to dramatic mistakes leading to the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster, which disintegrated upon re-entry in 2003.


“Large-scale engineered systems are more than just a collection of technological artifacts. They are a reflection of the structure, management, procedures, and culture of the engineering organization that created them.”

“They are also, usually, a reflection of the society in which they were created. The causes of accidents are frequently, if not always, rooted in the organization—its culture, management, and structure.”

“Blame for accidents is often placed on equipment failure or operator error without recognizing the social, organizational, and managerial factors that made such errors and defects inevitable.”

Nancy G. Leveson, MIT. Technical and Managerial Factors in the NASA Challenger and Columbia Losses: Looking Forward to the Future. Controversies in Science and Technology Volume 2, Mary Ann Liebert Press, 2008.


NASA 1Groupthink is part of the taxonomy of well-known cognitive biases and takes hold when divergent thinking and disagreement are discouraged (and even repressed) as part of group dynamics.

Hindsight is 20/20 and, statistically speaking, ‘black swan’ events are characterized by seemingly random surprise factors. Groupthink can obfuscate the early detection of predictors such as leading outliers and anomalies, which left unattended can overwhelm a given system over time… and be the source of cascading effects and critical failure.

Groupthink’s negative impact compromises any best intentions such as organizational cohesiveness in the spirit of consensus, agility, productivity, timely project progress and de-escalation management.

Often times, there might be neither adequate situational and risk awareness nor a basis for sense making drawing from the comparative analysis that comes with diligent scenario planning.


Individuals and organizational cultures with a succesful track record can also experience complacency. Over-confidence fosters the sort of behaviors and decisioning that served the group well in the past.

Though, when in the mix of a changing environment defined by new parameters under the radar, only operating within the perimeter of a given set of core competences and comfort zones, makes those specific behaviors blindsight and betray the team’s mission and purpose.

Many plans do not survive first contact (or a subsequent phase for that matter) as their implementation creates ‘ripple effects’ of various shapes and propagating speeds. Some of that can be experienced as ‘sudden risk exposure.’ Once passed the ‘point-of-no-return,’ if that challenge is met with neither contingency planning nor the ability to timely course correct, pivot or even deploy a basic safety-net offsetting the impact, the project fails to ‘cross the chasm’ and is headed for what’s technically known as the ‘valley of death.’


This was one of the key issues discussed by Clyton M. Christiansen when I took his Harvard class on the ‘Innovator’s Dilemma,’ and is also a key point behind Risto Siilasmaa’s ‘Paranoid Optimism’ as well Paul Romer’s ‘Conditional Optimism,’ all of which advocate for scenario planning and sensing optimization to be able to calibrate or re-assess the path forward.


“Michael Shermer stated in the September 2002 issue of Scientific American, ‘smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for nonsmart reasons.”

Groupthink can also manifest itself by means of ‘eco chamber’ effects’ as misguided consensus amplifies what becomes a “self-serving” bias. That is, in effect, a closed feedback loop process that magnifies logical fallacies. These can come across as reasonable enough postulates, though if based on rushed judgement and selective focus they can also suffer from ‘confirmation bias.’ This is the case when new evidence is only used to back-up the existing belief system rather than share new light.


In the context of Decision Support Systems and Cognitive Analytics, the above reasoning deficits become root causes of errors impacting operations. That can involve both (a) Human-Human and (b) Human-Machine interactions, as well as impacting programming work resulting in (c) biased algorithms and automation pitfalls when left unsupervised.


NASA 3


REFERENCES

Carisa Callini. Human Systems Engineering. NASA, August 7 2017. https://www.nasa.gov/content/human-systems-engineering

Carisa Callini. Spaceflight Human Factors. NASA, December 19 2018. https://www.nasa.gov/content/spaceflight-human-factors

Clayton M. Christensen. The Innovator’s Dilemma. Harvard Business Review Press, 1997.

COD Welecomes Astronaut Mark Kelly. Daily Herald, February 13 2019. https://www.dailyherald.com/submitted/20190201/cod-welcomes-astronaut-mark-kelly-feb-17

Geoffrey Moore. Crossing the Chasm. Haper Collins, 1991.

MIT Experts Reflect on Shuttle Tragedy. MIT News, February 3 2003. http://news.mit.edu/2003/shuttle2

Tim Peake. The Astronaut Selection Test Book. Century. London, 2018.

Scott Kelly. Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery. Knopf. New York, 2017.

Scott Kelly. Infinite Wonder. Knopf. New York, 2018.

Steve Young. Astronaut: ‘None of Us is as Dumb as All of Us.’ USA Today – Argus Leader, May 13, 2014. https://www.argusleader.com/story/news/2014/05/13/astronaut-none-us-dumb-us/9068537/

Will Knight.  Biased Algorithms are Everywhere, and No One Seems to Care. MIT Technology Review, July 12 2017. https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608248/biased-algorithms-are-everywhere-and-no-one-seems-to-care/