Tagged: Lean Operations

Digital Transformation Videos


“The debate surrounding digitalization has gained increased practical importance […] changes in business approaches, opportunities for organizations in operational and business process development, with effect on the internal and external efficiency of IT.”

“When planning for digital transformation, organizations must factor the cultural changes they’ll confront as workers and organizational leaders adjust to adopting and relying on unfamiliar technologies.”

“Digital transformation has created unique marketplace challenges and opportunities, as organizations must contend with nimble competitors who take advantage of the low barrier to entry that technology provides.”

“Additionally, due to the high importance given today to technology and the widespread use of it, the implications of digitalization for revenues, profits and opportunities have a dramatic upside potential.”

Wikipedia



2017 – LEAN OPS DSS  – DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM


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5 minute intro: restricted access

15 minute demo session: https://adobe.ly/2nWopH8


2016 – LEAN OPS – IMMERSIVE DATAVIZ & AUTONOMATION


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3 minute introduction: https://networks.nokia.com/videos/nfv-operations-keep-it-lean

15+ minute demo session: https://networks.nokia.com/videos/lean-nfv-operations-mwc-16

2015 – DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION WITH LEAN OPS


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10+ minute demo session: https://youtu.be/bgcNRBl0nVQ

20+ minute deep dive: https://youtu.be/TQEtgpEi5Mc


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60 min webinar: https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/6985/172207

90 min webinar: registration required


2013 – REDEFING LEAN FOR THE CLOUD AGE


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5 minute interview – processing


2008 – DIGITAL EXPERIENCE


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4 min day-in-the-life “emerging experiences” -Millennial Zoe: https://youtu.be/BDE6XSPHv6c

4 min day-in-the-life “forward looking concepts” -GenX Ethan: https://youtu.be/eX0Qm49RU_0



I need to spend some time locating and reviewing videos discussing other projects that I have been involved in for Mixed Reality (MR), Mobile Edge Computing (MEC), Interactive Mobile Media, Commuting Vehicles, and the Internet of Collaborative Robotics… and will share them in future updates.

Human Factors Engineering @ NOKIA: Celebrating HFE’s 70th Anniversary with Bell Labs


Mr. Karlin, associated from 1945 until his retirement in 1977 with Bell Labs, headquartered in Murray Hill, N.J., was widely considered the father of human-factors engineering in American industry. The legacy of that research now extends far beyond the telephone: the keypad design Mr. Karlin shepherded into being has become the international standard on objects as diverse as ATMs, gas pumps, door locks, vending machines and medical equipment […] In 1947 he persuaded Bell Labs to create a unit, originally called the User Preference department and later Human Factors Engineering, to study these larger questions.”

John E. Karlin, Who Led the Way to All-Digit Dialing, New York Times.


SNAGHTML2abe1c7bAs shared in my previous post, we were gearing up for Nokia’s event on Human Factors Engineering and kept busy with the final touches. The event management team at the Technology Leadership Council (TLC) had first planned to host this company conference on November 29. More recently, we moved it to December 6 to better manage some of the logistics.

However, since we will commemorate HFE’s 70th anniversary at Bell Labs this coming year, we have decided to shift gears: we are now working on a celebratory event expanding upon the current agenda. The date for the new conference has not yet been set. But, “third time’s the charm” and the event’s visibility, new scope and impact in 2017 are set to outdo our initial objectives. So, stay tuned : ) 

In the meantime, our team would like to thank everyone involved in planning and supporting activities up to this point. Given this new undertaking, we would also like to welcome those of you coming on board.

Last but not least, we are very grateful to our guest speakers and hope to be able to re-engage them for the bigger event.

You can click on the left picture to go back to my earlier post to see Nokia’s videos for some of the products and projects listed on the event’s current agenda. The following four ones feature our four guest speakers in some other videos, which happen to be available online. 


VIDEOS


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David Shrier, MIT


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Tom McTavish, IIT


Rodo Kotorov, Information Builders


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Gordon Vos, NASA


 

Happy Thanksgiving : )

Gearing up for Informa’s Back End of Innovation (BEI) 2016


“A great idea is only the beginning. The Back End of Innovation provides a strategic road map to successful commercialization. Learn how to bring new products to market and commercialize them for maximum impact on the bottom line.  Uncover new ways to solve problems we all encounter in today’s dynamic business world.” 

Back End of Innovation #BEICONF


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I am working on the talk that I will deliver at Back End of Innovation 2016 and just came across BEI’s banner on prominent sites, such as CNN’s Innovation section (left screenshot).

The organizers have made available a discount code, which I can share if you were interested in attending. If so, feel free to send me a message on LinkedIn.

The conference’s agenda features speakers from 3M, Cisco, Coca-Cola, Fidelity, Johnson & Johnson, Keurig, Pepsi, Vodafone and Xerox among others and I will be there proudly representing Nokia.

My talk’s title is “Lean Ops Innovation: Dynamic Service Delivery,” which is scheduled on November 17 at 11:30. Here is the abstract:


M2184_Back_banner_300x250_8-29-16_v1“Network Operators in the telecommunications industry operate complex sets of technologies and environments. This sector’s future relies on furthering software defined systems supporting the next wave of pervasive digital services, which all of us come to rely on in our day-to-day lives.

Nokia’s Applications & Analytics (A&A) team has evolved and redefined Lean principles to intertwine advanced analytics, automation, programmability and human factors engineering, the four pillars of a new LeanOps’ framework. The outcome is effective service delivery enabled by highly efficient systems that remain nimble and agile at any scale and at any point in the life-cycle. 


Join Jose for this session to learn:

  • A new Lean Ops framework intertwining analytics, automation, programmability and human factors.
  • How to effectively interweave Design Thinking, Lean, DevOps and Agile to deliver breakthrough innovation.
  • Unlocking the value of Human Factors Engineering in the cloud age and, therefore, expanding the human possibilities of technology.”

imageEarlier in the year I gave a talk at IEEE Communications Quality & Reliability – CQR 2016 also on Nokia’s Lean Ops.

Back then, my focus was HCI, Human-Computer-Interaction and operational efficiencies. As an example, immersive user interfaces taking advantage of 3D data visualization coupled with autonomation and assisted automation, as well as continuous optimization lead to effective decision support systems (DSS) that mitigate human error and elevate value based tasks.

That was discussed in the context of the kind of complex operational environments experienced in the telecommunications industry by network operators. As shared above, my presentation at BEI will focus on the underlying construct instead.


This is my “75 word” bio for this event: “Jose is a Design Director at Nokia’s Applications & Analytics Group. His 15+ years of experience feature leadership responsibilities in strategy, product management, R&D, and marketing. Jose worked with Bell Labs and holds three patents. He is a Member of the Advisory Board at MIT IDSS and is the recipient of an MBA from Chicago’s DePaul University as a Honeywell Europe’s Be Brilliant Scholar. Jose holds a postgraduate degree in Human Factors Engineering from BarcelonaTech.”


This is the second time that I’m featured as part of BEI’s Speaker Faculty and I would like to take this chance to thank the team at Informa for their kind invitation.

I will be happy to meet at BEI and hope to see you there : )

Innovation Management Essentials: Situational Awareness


“Develop foresight, to sense and understand the context around the dilemmas that challenge you. The goal is not to predict what’s going to happen but to provoke your creativity and prepare you for your biggest challenges, many of which are going to come in the form of dilemmas (…) leaders are sense makers, and they help others make sense- often by asking penetrating questions.” Get There Early by Bob Johansen.


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Situational Awareness (SA) involves sensemaking. SA deals with critical information on what’s going on with a project as well as around it. Know-how, past experiences, lessons learned and best practices are of the essence. These work well when addressing incremental innovation. Though, our perception is also shaped by motivation, expectations, filters as well as organizational behaviors (culture, workstyle, decision making, roles and responsibilities, processes) and, possibly, conflicting priorities.

Taking things to new levels, disruptive innovation gets us immersed in what turn out to be game changing environments. In this specific context, creative destruction takes place and so do errors in judgment. Dealing with uncertainty, ambiguity and rapidly superseding cascading events can quickly render one’s viewpoint out of focus and even out of place.

Those just sticking to what they know because relying on one’s “assumptions and belief system” has consistently served they well, might now suffer from complacency, myopia and tunnel vision instead… experiencing blindsiding denial in the process. Clayton’s “The Innovator’s Dilemma” and Taleb’s “The Black Swan” and “Antifragile” are worth understanding. 


Early awareness takes continuous listening and monitoring. Lets first think of project sensors gathering data and probes strategically placed to explore and discover clues which might not yet be visible. Leading indicators form a set of metrics that change in advance to a given event taking hold and can be used to raise alerts. Lagging indicators signal conditions in place for changes to take hold and become the new pattern.

Defining a narrow set of key performance indicators (KPI) improves visibility, saving us from clutter and information overload. KPIs can correlate and synthesize need-to-see data and can work with high level abstractions. These are usually delivered as “dashboards” that we can easily work with. Here is a “6 R” framework on KPI quality to mitigate distortions:


Relevancy: validity and utility level in context.   Resolution: meaningful detail and abstractions.
Range: scope (fields) and scale dimensions.   Recency: lifecycle – growth, decay and refresh velocity, ephemeral vs. durable.
Robustness: complete or sufficient to support the analysis, portrays what’s being measured.   Reliability: data integrity and error free, factors signal to noise rate, accounts for outliers.

The above is based on a “5 R” version I first learned on an MIT course about big data and social analytics.

I would also like to share that perfect data might be elusive and different quality levels can be applied. Hence, we talk in terms of things being “directionally correct” or “good enough” to keep things moving. In some other cases, over-engineering data by going beyond what’s really needed (data overload) can shortchange focus, efforts and budgets, which would be better allocated to other priority and/or pressing tasks. We can also face crunch time situations when we need to operate without benefiting from more data since delays would trigger higher risks.


Nonetheless, acknowledging that we need to make those kind of judgment calls does not excuse giving up on perfecting how to work with data. But, data alone will not deliver SA: this involves intertwining analysis and synthesis cycles as well as fine tuning sensemaking, which is an iterative and continuous improvement process.

Keeping cognitive biases at bay is a challenge. Subjective statements supporting adversarial stances such as “been there done that, it just doesn’t work” (even if that experience happened in a different context and a distant past) or the “not-invented here” (NIH) “not-one-of-us” syndromes can be easy to spot. But, there is a wide range of logical fallacies and “devil’s advocate” plays which can be perceived as reasonable even though the underlying logic is flawed.  


I designed the above chart drawing from the all familiar Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats (SWAT) model. As far as Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) is concerned, the one I get the most is about the difference between “clash” and “shift”. Basically, the clash’s bucket is there to outline ongoing mismatches and adversarial confrontations. Those having reached critical mass can be plotted in the “clash x critical” quadrant.

The “shift” column captures game changing items that are still evolving, where a succession of disruptive believes and assumptions reshape the context and prompt new environments that can render a project obsolete… shouldn’t we gear up in advance or course correct as needed. Looking into impact levels, correlations, outliers and then sorting things accordingly is part of the thought process.

The next FAQ relates to how to best address “core” vs. “beyond comfort zone”. A core competence is an existing skill and capability. This refers to traits worth leveraging and further developing provided that they continue to make a difference. Though, asking any person, organization or system to just focus on what they already know and do well might not necessarily be the best approach in today’s rapidly changing and commonplace uncertain environments. Therefore, the need for assessing what and how to continuously grow beyond a given comfort zone, and at what point that new capability can be rolled up as a core competency.

One other thought, let’s keep in mind that being aware and alert are good things. Taking no action or seating tight while waiting for the dust to settle happen to be options available to us, though paralysis by analysis or paralyzing fear are not.

What about “organic” vs. “inorganic”? The former entails opportunities that can be approached with existing competencies and, possibly, scaling by growing resources. The latter talks to efforts that involve collaborating (collaborating with customers and partners, coopetition with competitors) and even acquiring other ecosystem players in the value chain, mergers being another example.


Last but not least, perspective is of the essence and the journey is comprised by experiences (where we come from) situational awareness (where we are) and foresight (where we are headed). Antonio Machado (Spanish poet, 1875-1939) stated that we make our path as we walk, which anyone working on innovation projects can relate to. Delineating and providing a sense involves the following “journey points”, which I will discuss on another post on agile project planning:

  • kick-off / start point
  • takeoff limits
  • checkpoints
  • milestones
  • crossing chasms
  • touch points
  • breakeven point
  • tipping point
  • chain reaction
  • inflection point
  • turbulences
  • crossroads
  • decision points
  • pivoting
  • point of no return
  • breaking point
  • moving targets
  • valley of death
  • dead ends
  • aftermath

Hope this remains of interest. As usual, I will welcome your comments and emails to continue our discussion.

Link to my latest post.

Lean Ops Videos

Here is a selection of five Lean Ops video clips. There are a few other out there, which range from 60 to 90 minutes.

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VIDEO #1  3 min intro
Mobile World Congress 
Barcelona, March 2016
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VIDEO #2   17 min live session
Mobile World Congress
Barcelona, March 2016

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VIDEO #3  12 min intro 
Mobile World Congress
Barcelona, March 2015

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VIDEO #4   19 min live session 
Intel Developers Forum
San Francisco, August 2015

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VIDEO #5
5 min interview 
this link is no longer active
Nokia Cloud Innovation Center
Naperville, October 2011
   

 


Please go to Nokia’s Network Functions Virtualization and Lean Ops pages for more information.