Tagged: User Experience

QXbD, Quality Experiences by Design -Research Notes, Part 1.1


Munari and Descartes


Let’s start with a retrospective. While studying industrial design in Barcelona, all the way back in the late 80s, some of our class’ courses followed Bruno Munari‘s teachings, whose methodology was captured in “How Are Objects Born?


A PROJECTIZED DESIGN MEDTHODOLOGY

Munari’s world was introduced to our class as a multifaceted down-to-earth creative. He positioned a so-called “projectized methodology” as a logical sequence of desing operations aimed to maximize outcomes by applying the minimum required effort.

Munari emphasized the merits of painstaking work addressing “objective values” to generate creative outcomes… and strongly dismissed any whimsical and fanciful approach that would shortchange thoughtful due diligence and, therefore, proper design.

In that context, no disciplined practitioner should ignore the fact that discovery and iterative workstyles can lead to modifying and improving any method, as design tools and process also become a subject of design. Why? The set of assumptions, principles and rules deployed a project’s front-end… might not necessarily be the ones delivering successful outcomes at the project’s backend.


THE UNDERLYING THINKING

Munari’s referred to Rene Descartes’ “Discourse on the Method,” which was published 344 years before “How are Objects Born” was released. Most people relate Descartes’ better known “I think, therefore I am,’ statement. At the expense of possibly sounding corny, let’s translate that into “I Design Think, therefore…” for the purpose of this discussion.

In the 17th century, Descartes positioned a proven-fact based approach to problem solving: “true and sound judgements” that we can “intuit or deduce with certainty.” The so-called cartesian doubt involves methodological skepticism: nothing is taken for granted. The Scientific Revolution was taking hold. Earlier momentum generated the Renaissance was taken to new levels of enlightenment.

Descartes taskflow entailed decomposing complex matters down to what become atomic level ones: those are still coherent and manageable enough (cognitively speaking) for us to effectively address. His method calls for solving for the ones that can be successfully tackled first.


GETTING THE DESIGN JOB DONE

Munari’s mind-mapping illustrated a taxonomy of primary, secondary and more granular lower level problem statements as needed, followed by data gathering and analysis. Experimentation ran options assessment.

New discovery was encouraged. Technical and production feasibility considerations being instrumental early in the process so that constrains and implementation choices were well understood. Once testable prototypes become available, iterative user involvement and validation drove improvement and optimization A design prospectus and project file would feature:

  • Final design proposal and prototypes.
  • Problem mindmap.
  • Design specifications sheet.
  • Notes on streamlined design considerations optimizing for simplicity.
  • Production cost and comparison analysis.
  • Use cases, expected functionality and performance.
  • Sensory and experiential assessment, accounting for all senses.
  • Ergonomics, usability, maneuverability, including health hazards.
  • Journey touch points and wear & tear: upkeep, maintenance, serviceability.
  • Impact of ad-ons, packaging, and any other attached and surrounding items.
  • Aesthetic coherence and modular design components.
  • Social value and cultural contribution.

THE GREATER VALUE OF DESIGN’s WHOLE

Back to Descartes, he would point to the need for addressing the integrity of the overall system and, therefore, the higher value of the composite view. This also is about ensuring that no gaps, breaking points, ruptures, weak-links, leaks, and loopholes remain. Basically, stress testing our solution with a “continuous and wholly uninterrupted sweep of thought” as he would put it.

Just a couple of more things about Descartes… in his “Rules for the Direction of the Mind” explicitly he stated that “we need a method if we are to investigate the truth of things” and should investigate “what others have already discovered.”

And in the “Discourse on the Method” he introduced data visualization by means of correlating values with the cartesian coordinate system, which intersected geometry and algebra to become the foundation of analytics geometry.


Catalan Modernism and Bauhaus Chairs


DESIGN PRINCIPLES

The Bauhaus’s centenial anniversary, 1919-2019, is worth highlighting. During my industrial design studies, the German Bauhaus‘ lasting influence was quite significant and largely conveyed by professors and program directors with a professional background in architecture. Here is a summary of what that meant:

  • Form follows function.
  • Less is more: straighforwarness, abstract simplicity, and great refinement.
  • Clean design and aestic finesse, all production friendly and scalable.
  • Adopting and pushing the boundaries of emerging technologies.
  • Designing is not a profession, but an attitude.
  • Indivisible unity of formerly separated and indenpendent fields and silos.
  • Craftmanship pride and signature designs that make a difference.

The American New Bauhaus influenced the post-World War II culture and settled in Chicago at the Institute of Design, part of th IIT, Illinois Institute of Technology.

Our class was confronted with a compeling Bahuasian approach that could result in highly formal, rigid and austere geometrical configurations while Barcelona’s environment was (and continues to be) a reminder of the contrasting Catalan Modernism of the early 20th century, unapologetically being:

  • Abstracted organic shapes, shapes and structures that are nature inspired.
  • Carefully crafted eclectic sophistication and visually arresting outcomes.
  • Celebratory by mashing up historical elements under a new light.
  • Theatrical experiences as people become design’s live audiences.
  • Strong sense of cultural change agency.

Also worth recalling that the late 80s intersected Post-Modernism, a movement that featured a wide variety of optics and was a departure from rationalism and, therefore, purposevely confrontational. Subjectivity and and criticism abounded.


Descartes Books


DESIGN FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Munari’s “projectized methodology” helped dissect problems and got the design job done while keeping any rushed and whimsical design at bay: no need for the overly and out-of-touch “romantic” stuff as he saw it. Munari also confronted any “luxurious” and “fashionable” design statements, which he qualified as superfluous and frivolous, and the antitesis of design.

But, it did present the sort of shortcomings that can come from applying constrains from the get go. The fact is that freethinking can make a difference at the project’s onset. Applying Descartes’ methodological skepticism would neutralize that. However, relying on Descartes’ rational wisdom alone does not suffice. Damasio’s “Descartes Error” exposes the following:


“Reason may not be as pure as most of us think it is or wish it were […] emotion assists with the process of holding in mind the multiple facts that must be considered in order to reach a decision. The obligate participation of emotion in the reasoning process can be advantageous or nefarious […] when emotion is entirely left out of the reasoning picture, as happens in certain neurological conditions, reason turns out to be even more flawed than when emotion plays bad tricks on our decisions”.


My next article will continue this late 80s and early 90s restropective, which takes me back to my college years. I will switch to my experience in engineering school for the purpose of deliverating about what QUALITY really is about. As an example, I will exchange views on TQM, Total Quality Management, and Operational Excellence… and will circle back to this post to connect the dots to clearly define QXbD, Quality Experiences by Design.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • Damasio, Antonio R.. Descartes’ Error. Penguin Publishing Group, 1994.
  • Munari, Bruno. Como Nacen los Objectos. GG, 1981
  • Descartes, Rene. Discourse on the Method. 1637
  • The New Bauhaus. Opendox, 2019. Accessed on May 12, 2019 https://www.thenewbauhaus.com

 

#MakeTechHuman @ Nokia Studio


Nokia Studio

Nokia Studio - Chicago Tech Center

The Studio at Nokia Software engages in interdisciplinary work to create advanced data visualization and sophisticated cybernetics for human-machine-systems in complex enterprise operational environments. We are implementing our home-grown QXbD, Quality Experiences by Design, meta-methodology to #MakeTechHuman.

Design & Innovation Advisory Board

Our community efforts as a member of CMP’s Design & Innovation Advisory Board, lead to Nokia’s involvement in the following conferences, which focus on HCD, Human Centered Design, practices:

IEEE CQR 2019 5G and User Needs.jpg

We are also a regular contributor to IEEE Communications Quality & Reliability, and, just recently, 5G Capabilities to Meet User Needs session at CQR International Workshop 2019 in Naples, FL.


Nokia HFE2019

Nokia Studio - HFE19 Conference

The HFE2017 conference celebrated the pioneering spirit of the team at Bell Labs that institutionalized human centered design in the high tech industry all the way back in 1947. We are now implementing HFE2019 under a talk series program over the course of the year. Stay tuned as more information becomes available.

The above version of the Human Factors Engineering Manifesto was first released in 2017 and sought to share HFE’s end-to-end systems thinking in today’s digital world. We are making updates that incorporate feedback received since.

What follows is just a sample of Nokia’s public initiatives:


Nokia Bell Labs Future Human

Bell Labs‘ podcast series explores the human potential of technology. Many of the innovations we take for granted have been hatched over decades, forged by an unlikely and ongoing collaboration between emerging artists and the keenest engineering minds in the world.”

“As the science fiction of days past – self-driving cars, Star Trek-like communicators and interstellar tourism – becomes everyday reality, where will the next great ideas come from? Listen in as today’s most adventurous creators inspire their scientific peers to unleash a more connected world.”

Nokia Bell Labs Future Human


Nokia People & Planet Report 2017

Nokia is at the dawn of a new era. Digital technologies – cloud computing, artificial intelligence, machine learning, the Internet of Things, and soon, 5G networks – are changing the way we live and work in countless ways.”

“Technology and solutions from Nokia will help power this digital future, and we are excited about the possibilities. We also recognize that we have the opportunity as well as responsibility to apply technology in ways that enhance people’s lives and, more broadly, advance humanity.”

“Today, we continue to focus our social responsibility activities on four key areas: improving lives with technology; protecting the environment; conducting business with integrity; and respecting our people.”

Nokia People & Planet 2017 Report


Nokia Futurithmic

“How will the rapid advances in technology affect our lives at work, in our homes, and in our daily interactions with others? Here, we examine the human side of emerging technologies, considering the endless possibilities they bring and the complex challenges that they may bring.”

Nokia Futurithmic


Nokia MakeTechHuman

“In 2015, the WIRED and Nokia partnered to kickstart a global debate on how to make technology serve humanity better called #maketechhuman.”

“It was aimed at uncovering what worries—and what excites—people about innovation today, from the most influential minds on the planet to your next-door neighbor.”

“This effort involved 80+ luminaries, thought leaders and partners including Tim Berners-Lee, Stephen Hawking, Monica Lewinsky, Megan Smith, Sugata Mitra, and Matt Mira.”

Nokia led a global debate exploring the excitement and worries associated with humanity’s relationship with technology, we sought to uncover the issues that mattered most, investigate them and highlight global solutions.”


Studio at Nokia Software.jpg

Nokia Studio. 2000 Lucent Lane. Naperville, IL 60563. United States.


Design Thinking 2019 Interview – Part 2


Design Thinking 2019 Blog Banne

Design Thinking 2019  #DesignThinking2019


FULL LENGTH TRANSCRIPT VERSION


Design Thinking 2019 - Logo

How would you define your organization’s maturity to Design Thinking?


Nokia Corporation


cropped-Jose-de-Francisco-LinkedIn-3Nokia is a Fortune’s Global 500 corporation headquartered in Finland, which involves in excess of 100,000 employees worldwide. Most of us joined the company in recent years… which I think is nothing short from fascinating.

Nowadays, Nokia is a top B2B player in large scale digital communication technologies. Most specifically: 5G, Internet of Things, Cloud and Software just to list some well-known examples.

R. Siilasmaa’s recent book, “Transforming Nokia,” discusses what it took to pull off the company’s dramatic recovery in the past few years, while noting that this is not the first time that we reinvent ourselves since 1865. His leadership style is characterized by “Paranoid Optimism,” which I’d like to discuss in context later on.


Nokia Studio 3


At Nokia Studio we intertwine disciplines such as Data Visualization, Cybernetics and Behavioral Economics to design state of the art Decision Support Systems for next-generation digital services. These are Human-Machine-Systems (HMS.)

Given our focus on game changing innovations, Human-Centered-Design (HCD) happens to be a critical success factor at all stages in the iterative exploration, definition, introduction and broader diffusion of emerging and next generation technologies Design Thinking’s desirability, technical feasibility and business viability are, therefore, well understood critical success factors.


Nokia Studio 4


The Studio’s research addresses how to clearly articulate early desirability coupled with market-pull & outside-in strategies.  Thinking through the business value of design signals the need for removing friction from a B2B journey that involves formal contractual acceptance as the accounting trigger behind revenue recognition.

Geoffrey A. Moore’s classic, “Crossing the Chasm,” and Clayton M. Christensen’s best-seller “The Innovator’s Dilemma” make all of us mindful of the need for addressing the journey between early adopters (FOA, first office application, in the telecoms sector) and adequately scaling in the marketplace.

This means expanding across segments and industries to leverage economies of scale and, therefore, continuous improvement and innovation. Following that train of thought, consistently and predictably delivering superior satisfaction levels in the form of customer delight becomes a decisive and sustainable competitive advantage.


Nokia Studio 5


Our Studio is engaged in large, sophisticated and fluid projects that involve inter-domain undertakings. Successful cross-pollination intersects three dimensions:

  • going wide across domains to take down silos and deep on a domain basis to best leverage our know-how
  • tightly or loosely coupled integration in the value-chain / supply-chain ecosystem
  • in-house and external collaboration in alignment with the above

While purposely implied by the naming, it is worth highlighting that our home-grown QXbD, Quality Experiences by Design, methodology zeroes in on delivering meaningful, differentiated and measurable quality outcomes that are tangible to our customers.

Nokia QXbD has been conceived as a meta-discipline that can be deconstructed and re-shaped on a project and sought-after outcomes basis. We can, therefore, not just start agile but also remain truly lean to effectively get the job done.


Transforming NokiaAs introduced early on, Risto’s Transforming Nokia, discusses the impact of “Paranoid Optimism” which is also explicitly captured in the book’s subtitle. Tactically speaking, that means: leveraging the hindsight that comes from analyzing lessons learned, the thought process that leads to both obvious and hidden insights, as well as applying creative tensions and foresight to flush-out not just one single path forward, but alternative different scenarios for consideration.

In that context, Optimism in design fosters the pursuit of an ambitious game changing scenario. Being purposely Paranoid involves the sort of predictive and responsive monitoring that prompts and guides necessary reality checks and course corrections… and even pivoting in a timely fashion. This acknowledges the ripple effects and moving targets that arise when innovating and/or transforming which, when ignored, can derail any well-intended transformation effort.


Nokia at Mobile World Congress 2019


Interestingly enough, Jim Collins’ painstaking research behind “Great by Choice” outlined that Productive Paranoia is a critical success factor. He exemplifies companies that have consistently delivered 10x results by outperforming competitors in bull and bear market conditions. Jim defines Productive Paranoia as a must-have business obsession, where contingency planning and risk mitigation are of the essence.


Paul Romer, World Bank Chief Economist and last year’s Nobel laureate, makes the case for Conditional Optimism and innovation being the outcome of the marketplace’s “discovery machine.” He differentiates between complacent and conditional optimism.

The complacent kind relies on deploying hard work to make things happen, and keep iterating, while hoping for the best by setting things in motion… also described as blind optimism. Conditional Optimism focuses on proactively finding solutions to problems, and closely monitoring outcomes thru the transformation journey.


Long story short… in Nokia’s context, Design Thinking maturity can be measured by our optimism as we strive to deliver state of the art technologies that augment and expand human possibilities, coupled with paranoid and creative tensions as we purposely obsess with delivering quality experiences.


Design Thinking 2019  #DesignThinking2019