Tagged: User Experience

Design Thinking 2021 Conference: Design Leadership Award Finalist



“We’re excited to announce the Design Thinking Champion Finalists for the 2021 Design & Innovation Awards!  The awards celebrate and recognize innovation and human-centered design (HCD) accomplishments across communities and organizations. Come join us this September 20th at Design Thinking 2021”

Design & Innovation Global. For more information, visit designthinkingusa.com  #DIAwards2021 #DesignThinking2021


At the time of writing this, I am in the process of completing my presentation materials for Design Thinking 2021 where I will be discussing Human Centered Artificial Intelligence (HC AI) driven by Quality eXperiences by Design (QXbD). Here is the link to the abstract for that session, which has been scheduled for the afternoon of Tuesday, September 21. Admittedly, this is bitter sweet since I will be missing Nokia‘s Algorithm World, which takes place that same day at the Nokia Chicago Innovation Center, my home base.

I am very glad to share that Nokia is this year’s twice finalist for awards in the areas of Digital Transformation and Design Leadership. This post shares last night’s news on the later. Given the caliber of the participants, this is a humbling experience which credits the thoughtfulness, ingenuity and passion of the interdisciplinary cohorts involved at the Venture Design Studio (VDS) and the opportunity to work with customers, partners and peers, who happen to be among the best in industry in today’s changing environment.

At a personal level, I am not only grateful for everyone’s consideration, but also for the opportunity to continue to actively contribute to our shared interest in the Design & Innovation community around devising sound technological solutions that put people first. On our team’s behalf, I would like to also convey the very best to Tata Consultancy Services and to Chrysalis who are also finalists for this year’s Design Champion Award. Looking forward to seeing you and continuing the discussion onsite and online as needed.

DESIGN THINKING 2021 CONFERENCE – DESIGN THINKING CHAMPION AWARD – FINALISTS

Nokia on Design Thinking, AI and starting with what users need


“Any organization that wants to deliver targeted, personalized services and experiences needs to understand its customers inside and out: their wants, wishes, behaviors and attitudes.”

“These days, the data to develop that understanding is abundantly available. The challenge is to extract meaningful customer insights from it and convert those insights into actions.”

“By combining the principles of Design Thinking with the power of Artificial Intelligence (AI), CIOs have the tools to solve that problem and deliver powerful business results for their organizations.”



Design Thinking, AI and starting with what users need” was just released this past October 15. The full article is available on CIODIVE, which I am proud to co-sign with Santeri Jussila, Head of Analytics Product Line at Nokia Software. Also thanks to Nokia’s own Patty Wong, Malla Poikela, Araceli del Rio and Marcelo Fabri. What follows is some additional color commentary and additional insights.


Reviewed on Sunday, October 20.

Design visions in the making.

I truly believe that these are exciting times. Often enough we recall and discuss visions conceived decades ago. We marvel about our predecessors’ foresight. Then we wonder about what’s actually truly new these days as we reach the magical 2020 time horizon: are we still innovating or just rehashing old concepts? Besides, what is the meaning of “real” and “true” in what the Oxford Dictionary defines as the post-truth era?

The fact is that a reality check unveils a thriving ecosystem economy where a number of the bits-&-pieces that any of us need to innovate with are coming together. Better yet, this is also happening at accelerated speeds and cost effective levels. In turn, Design Thinking is fostering new foresight around the possibilities ahead… basically, new visions in the making.


There is more to 5G.

As shared in the CIODIVE article, 5G has become a galvanizing technology. 5G goes well beyond radio optimization outpacing what 4G and earlier wireless systems had to offer. To be more specific: we are intersecting: lightspeed networking, scalable virtualizaiton, dynamic software defined instruments and systems, actionable analytics, agile automation… and new levels of programmability, all equipped with unprecedented intelligence.

Speaking of intelligence, the best that cybernetics has to offer comes in the form of context-aware and always-learning systems optmizing for exploration, decisioning and control. Their growth and high performance are driven by adaptive closed feedback-loop workflows, which entail both, human and machine smarts.


Fast evolving HMS, Human Machine Systems.

We all know and, nonetheless, history keeps reminding us that technical prowess alone does not suffice. At Nokia’s Venture Studio we are working on outcome-oriented HMS, Human-Machine-Systems.

This is why we purposely focus on usefulness, utillity, usability and affectivity values. In our line of work, Human Centered Design (HCD) and Human Factors Engineering (HFE) make a compelling difference.



Our thinking behind the design of Human-Machine-Systems is that they should be conceived and stress-tested for effectiveness (e.g. getting the job done, delivering meaningful results) and efficiency (e.g. optimizing resource utilization levels, maximizing value) as well as getting only smarter iteration after iteration, cycle after cycle.


Nokia Venture Studio.

Delivering High Performance Environments (HPE) and Quality Experiences by Design (QXbD) inform our Studio’s meta-methodology, lead to fluid practices and, equally important, signal a distinctive creative workstyle.



Digitizing the Digitalization Era.

It does not hurt to state the obvious: digitalization is now pervasive. Following that train of thought, digitalization also means both on-demand lightspeed consumption and instant mass personalization.

It means democratizing tech so that the digital divide becomes a thing of the past and no-one is left behind. It means self-service empowerment and curated expert services as needed.

It means scaling at speed and greater scope than ever before. It means clever centralization to leverage shared resource pools and operational efficiencies. And it means even smarter and highly dynamic decentralization as we get closer to the end user and effectively optimize on the basis of the experience economy. This is a hybrid world in permanent motion with any “thing” (and anything) is provided as a service, anywhere, anytime. Watch for ripple effects.


Digital Services by Design.

From a Service Design standpoint, the backstage’s operational experience entails painstaking work on: redefining success and outomes, job re-design, process re-engineering, and setting the state-of-the-art. Addressing these happens to be critical success factors.

I will be more specific. DTV, Design to Value, now means that we need to design and gear up for signature experiences. These register delight, rather than just conforming to yesteryear’s cookie cutter market segmentation and just aiming to “satisfy.” We are going past “segmentation” and “personas” to better act on “persona-lization” – segment-of-one in other words.

Digitalization’s paradoxes are here and in full force: (1) we are purposely shifting the “new normal” by creating opportunities to pleasantly “surprise and differentiate” rather that just normalize, standarize and penalize deviation or outliers; (2) the more we talk about extreme automation and zero touch systems, the more (not the less) humans (and a more diverse population) gets to interact with sophisticated systems otherwise formerly restricted to domain experts and obscure fields.



Designing for “digital transparency” brings you user friendly self-service, recsys (recommender systems) affective computing and xAI, Explainable Artificial Intelligence, just to name a few examples. We can now design for the senses and do that by engaging in natural language and with immersive and interative infographic visualization.

As Arthur C. Clark’s third law stated: “any sufficiently advanced technology is indistiguishable from magic.” Also bear in mind that his second law was: “the only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture into the impossible.”



It’s about culture…

At Nokia’s Venture Studio, our work and craftsmanship is the product of a thriving culture, one that we are also consciously influencing and shaping (think Escher’s Drawing Hands) to adequately foster human possibilities.

QXbD, Quality Experiences by Design -Research Notes, Part 1.1


Munari and Descartes


Let’s start with a retrospective. While studying industrial design in Barcelona, all the way back in the late 80s, some of our class’ courses followed Bruno Munari‘s teachings, whose methodology was captured in “How Are Objects Born?


A PROJECTIZED DESIGN MEDTHODOLOGY

Munari’s world was introduced to our class as a multifaceted down-to-earth creative. He positioned a so-called “projectized methodology” as a logical sequence of desing operations aimed to maximize outcomes by applying the minimum required effort.

Munari emphasized the merits of painstaking work addressing “objective values” to generate creative outcomes… and strongly dismissed any whimsical and fanciful approach that would shortchange thoughtful due diligence and, therefore, proper design.

In that context, no disciplined practitioner should ignore the fact that discovery and iterative workstyles can lead to modifying and improving any method, as design tools and process also become a subject of design. Why? The set of assumptions, principles and rules deployed a project’s front-end… might not necessarily be the ones delivering successful outcomes at the project’s backend.


THE UNDERLYING THINKING

Munari’s referred to Rene Descartes’ “Discourse on the Method,” which was published 344 years before “How are Objects Born” was released. Most people relate Descartes’ better known “I think, therefore I am,’ statement. At the expense of possibly sounding corny, let’s translate that into “I Design Think, therefore…” for the purpose of this discussion.

In the 17th century, Descartes positioned a proven-fact based approach to problem solving: “true and sound judgements” that we can “intuit or deduce with certainty.” The so-called cartesian doubt involves methodological skepticism: nothing is taken for granted. The Scientific Revolution was taking hold. Earlier momentum generated the Renaissance was taken to new levels of enlightenment.

Descartes taskflow entailed decomposing complex matters down to what become atomic level ones: those are still coherent and manageable enough (cognitively speaking) for us to effectively address. His method calls for solving for the ones that can be successfully tackled first.


GETTING THE DESIGN JOB DONE

Munari’s mind-mapping illustrated a taxonomy of primary, secondary and more granular lower level problem statements as needed, followed by data gathering and analysis. Experimentation ran options assessment.

New discovery was encouraged. Technical and production feasibility considerations being instrumental early in the process so that constrains and implementation choices were well understood. Once testable prototypes become available, iterative user involvement and validation drove improvement and optimization A design prospectus and project file would feature:

  • Final design proposal and prototypes.
  • Problem mindmap.
  • Design specifications sheet.
  • Notes on streamlined design considerations optimizing for simplicity.
  • Production cost and comparison analysis.
  • Use cases, expected functionality and performance.
  • Sensory and experiential assessment, accounting for all senses.
  • Ergonomics, usability, maneuverability, including health hazards.
  • Journey touch points and wear & tear: upkeep, maintenance, serviceability.
  • Impact of ad-ons, packaging, and any other attached and surrounding items.
  • Aesthetic coherence and modular design components.
  • Social value and cultural contribution.

THE GREATER VALUE OF DESIGN’s WHOLE

Back to Descartes, he would point to the need for addressing the integrity of the overall system and, therefore, the higher value of the composite view. This also is about ensuring that no gaps, breaking points, ruptures, weak-links, leaks, and loopholes remain. Basically, stress testing our solution with a “continuous and wholly uninterrupted sweep of thought” as he would put it.

Just a couple of more things about Descartes… in his “Rules for the Direction of the Mind” explicitly he stated that “we need a method if we are to investigate the truth of things” and should investigate “what others have already discovered.”

And in the “Discourse on the Method” he introduced data visualization by means of correlating values with the cartesian coordinate system, which intersected geometry and algebra to become the foundation of analytics geometry.


Catalan Modernism and Bauhaus Chairs


DESIGN PRINCIPLES

The Bauhaus’s centenial anniversary, 1919-2019, is worth highlighting. During my industrial design studies, the German Bauhaus‘ lasting influence was quite significant and largely conveyed by professors and program directors with a professional background in architecture. Here is a summary of what that meant:

  • Form follows function.
  • Less is more: straighforwarness, abstract simplicity, and great refinement.
  • Clean design and aestic finesse, all production friendly and scalable.
  • Adopting and pushing the boundaries of emerging technologies.
  • Designing is not a profession, but an attitude.
  • Indivisible unity of formerly separated and indenpendent fields and silos.
  • Craftmanship pride and signature designs that make a difference.

The American New Bauhaus influenced the post-World War II culture and settled in Chicago at the Institute of Design, part of th IIT, Illinois Institute of Technology.

Our class was confronted with a compeling Bahuasian approach that could result in highly formal, rigid and austere geometrical configurations while Barcelona’s environment was (and continues to be) a reminder of the contrasting Catalan Modernism of the early 20th century, unapologetically being:

  • Abstracted organic shapes, shapes and structures that are nature inspired.
  • Carefully crafted eclectic sophistication and visually arresting outcomes.
  • Celebratory by mashing up historical elements under a new light.
  • Theatrical experiences as people become design’s live audiences.
  • Strong sense of cultural change agency.

Also worth recalling that the late 80s intersected Post-Modernism, a movement that featured a wide variety of optics and was a departure from rationalism and, therefore, purposevely confrontational. Subjectivity and and criticism abounded.


Descartes Books


DESIGN FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Munari’s “projectized methodology” helped dissect problems and got the design job done while keeping any rushed and whimsical design at bay: no need for the overly and out-of-touch “romantic” stuff as he saw it. Munari also confronted any “luxurious” and “fashionable” design statements, which he qualified as superfluous and frivolous, and the antitesis of design.

But, it did present the sort of shortcomings that can come from applying constrains from the get go. The fact is that freethinking can make a difference at the project’s onset. Applying Descartes’ methodological skepticism would neutralize that. However, relying on Descartes’ rational wisdom alone does not suffice. Damasio’s “Descartes Error” exposes the following:


“Reason may not be as pure as most of us think it is or wish it were […] emotion assists with the process of holding in mind the multiple facts that must be considered in order to reach a decision. The obligate participation of emotion in the reasoning process can be advantageous or nefarious […] when emotion is entirely left out of the reasoning picture, as happens in certain neurological conditions, reason turns out to be even more flawed than when emotion plays bad tricks on our decisions”.


My next article will continue this late 80s and early 90s restropective, which takes me back to my college years. I will switch to my experience in engineering school for the purpose of deliverating about what QUALITY really is about. As an example, I will exchange views on TQM, Total Quality Management, and Operational Excellence… and will circle back to this post to connect the dots to clearly define QXbD, Quality Experiences by Design.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • Damasio, Antonio R.. Descartes’ Error. Penguin Publishing Group, 1994.
  • Munari, Bruno. Como Nacen los Objectos. GG, 1981
  • Descartes, Rene. Discourse on the Method. 1637
  • The New Bauhaus. Opendox, 2019. Accessed on May 12, 2019 https://www.thenewbauhaus.com