Tagged: Virtualization

Nokia’s First Prize for Product Innovation goes to LeanOps


“Inventing the Future with a focus on groundbreaking innovation, Nokia has been a catalyst for the world’s most powerful, game-changing technology shifts. We are committed to innovating for people and developing new technologies and solutions for the world we live in. With our Technology Vision 2020, we are helping operators deal with extreme traffic growth, simplify network operations and provide the ultimate personal gigabyte experience.”  https://networks.nokia.com/innovation


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Last month I joined the Chicago’s Science Fair as a judge in the Computer Science category. I am glad to share that received a plaque for my fifth year of service. Then, just a month later, I found myself on the other side of things as a contestant at Nokia’s Innovation Event in Espoo, Finland.

This year’s competition registered about 500 submissions worldwide. LeanOps qualified among the Top 3 Finalists in the Product & Solution Innovation Category. Ted East and I made the trip from Chicago to present on behalf of the team. We all were happy enough with LeanOps’ Finalist position. Moreover, any of the other finalist and shortlisted projects deserved being recipients of the first prize anyway. That speaks to Nokia’s renewed ingenuity and technical prowess.

But, those of us scheduled to be on stage could also feel the kind of mounting pressure that comes from making the most of this sort of high visibility opportunity. So, Ted and I spent a considerable amount of effort crafting and improving our delivery until the very last minute. We had the benefit of invaluable coaching and genuine advice while gearing up for this event. That should not be taken for granted and, therefore, we are humble and grateful for it. The fact is that Barry’s, Fabian’s, Kelvin’s, Corinna’s and Tuuli’s consideration and words of wisdom paid off. We came back home with the First Prize and our gratitude should be extended to everyone making this year’s event happen. My apologies for not having listed everyone’s names here.

Communicating science and technology is a challenge: any of us can risk alienating audiences willing to listen and individuals who would otherwise be excited about what our project entails. Information overload, convoluted jargon and failing to convey what the actual impact would be can jeopardize anyone’s good work due to lack of clarity. Moreover, it can compromise funding opportunities and drive collaboration and talented people away. So, it shouldn’t be hard to concur with Alan Alda, founder of the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University, when he states that “science communication” is as important as science itself (watch min 01:20 onward):



On my own note’s cover page I always scribble a couple of Einstein’s quotes: “if you cannot explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough” and “everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.” The former reminds me about the negative effect of self-defeating complexity. The later cautions about the diminishing returns of over-simplification and nonsense. Audiences can spot either issue right away, which negatively impacts speakers’ credibility and reputation. Recovering from that bad impression becomes an uphill battle and, unfortunately, bridges can be also burned for no good reason.

Communicating science and technology works best when striking an equilibrium point with (a) a well structured flow populated with (b) meaningful and engaging information of interest that is (c) purposely abstracted at the right level for each audience. Admittedly, by being in Human Factors Engineering, I cannot help but thinking that Information and Cognition Theory principles which serve us well when addressing the design of UI, User Interfaces, also become of the essence in any activity where we happen to be the medium to disseminate concepts, achievements, possibilities, constrains and what’s needed to move forward with a given project.


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There also is a need for working with visual communication that can effectively deliver far more information than what words alone would be able to. We created backdrops of infographic quality that helped set the stage at each step. Half way of the talk we played a short video clip that illustrated a key and differentiated project element.

Our discussion flow followed a basic creative brief breakdown, which covered: what, why, how, who and when and the Q&A section helped us provide the next level of detail. Long story short, relevant content of substance remains “conditio sine qua non” – which means distilling indispensable items down to need-to-know, anything you-cannot-do-without.


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We also had an impactful demo station at the so-called bazaar area, which had been unveiled and praised by experts at Mobile World Congress 2017 back in March. Last but not least, full credit for this award goes to one of the best teams in our industry. These are craftpeople who put their diverse talent to work by solving new and hard problems and, most importantly, making stuff work in no time.


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Lean NFV Ops @ Carrier Network Virtualization 2015


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This turned out to be another intensive year (more on that in my next post) and the above pictures capture our team’s presence at Carrier Network Virtualization, the last public event on the Lean NFV Ops program for 2015. I like to thank Christie Rice for her invitation to present at Intel Network Builders Summit in Palo Alto, and couldn’t be happier to hear that my presentation, Communication Networks Reloaded, was well received (see slides below) by the workshop participants. I would also like to thank Sue Morehouse with our Events Team and Andy Mast at the Cloud Innovation Center for all the work that went into getting our team organized for CNV15.



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Photo album: https://flic.kr/s/aHskptDZXC


Related posts:

Lean NFV Ops: Communication Networks Reloaded


“Communication Networks Reloaded – See and experience key emerging technologies converging to deliver Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) in innovative ways that clearly outpace and disrupt today’s communication networks. This tech talk addresses sophisticated concepts in an interactive and fast paced demonstration where services are subjected to a number of configuration changes in real time, including deployment, scaling and failures. Note that this is not a Proof of Concept (PoC) project but rather a state of the art demonstration integrating commercial and open source solutions.

“Lean NFV Ops – Lean Network Functions Virtualization Operations is a practice delivering nimble communication systems that remain lean and agile at any scale. Lean NFV Ops addresses a pressing need for enabling what can otherwise become elusive dynamic services impacted by sprawling silos, bloated architectures and disjointed development creep. This presentation introduces Lean’s quality management principles defined at the intersection of service level effectiveness and highly efficient asset utilization. We will discuss maturity and technology readiness as well as RAS (Reliability, Availability, Serviceability) in the context of software defined communication systems.

Illinois Institute of Technology, Real Time Communications Conference & Expo 2015.


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Source pictures: https://flic.kr/s/aHskihXtyy.


This week Alcatel-Lucent’s team is delivering six tech talks at IIT Real Time Comms. Rapport is sponsoring this event jointly with AT&T, T-Mobile and Cisco’s Tropo at platinum level. IIT Real Time Comms is characterized by workshop style tech talks focusing on communication networks and services. Just as an example, I am listing here five of the event’s topics, which I happen to be very interested in:

  • Network densification: what works, what doesn’t and what’s to come. Mithun Thakur, Verizon Wireless.
  • Architecture for B2B2C. Tetsuya Hishiki, NTT.
  • A hybrid Deep Packet Inspection architecture for NFV: Emera Ben Abdekrim, Université du Québec.
  • Cognitive security: security analytics and autonomics for virtualized networks. Lalita Jagadeesan, Alcatel-Lucent.
  • 5G: what can we learn from the previous four generations. Henning Schulzrinne, Columbia University.

This other link will take you the complete conference agenda covering Mobile Networks & Applications, Internet of Things and Next Generation Emergency Communications, in addition the the WebRTC and Cloud Communications Track that I have the pleasure to chair with Alan Johnston.

Above, in lower right corner, you can also see a photograph of Anne Lee’s immersive 3D presentation. Anne gave her talk using Rapport with WebRTC, coupled with Intel’s RealSense and Personify, a Chicago start-up.



These are the slides I talked about yesterday. I would like to take this chance to thank those of you attending my two sessions on Communication Networks Reloaded for your questions and interest in Lean NFV Ops. We ended up extending the combined sessions’ total time to around 90 minutes. Needless to say that I will be glad to keep the conversation going over email, on a call or in person as you see fit.

By the way, those of you who happened to make it to previous talks will find the following additions:

  • Page 2: up front positioning of PMO vs. FMO basics with the Venn Diagram me that defines Lean NFV Ops.
  • Pages 3-16: discussion on the Lean NFV Ops demonstration system.
  • Page 31: minor improvements to the PMO vs. FMO comparison table on DevOps.
  • Page 38: Lean NFV Op’s new “golden spiral” on application performance.
  • Page 39: a more detailed PMO vs. FMO matrix deconstructing Lean, NFV and Ops.
  • Page 41: new link to our most recent webinar hosted by Layer123 a week ago.

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I also added a new “food for thought” slide (page 19) with insights I captured while reading “The Evolution of Useful Things.” This book was published back in 1992 by Henry Petroski, an engineer focusing on failure analysis and a passion for exploring design principles conveyed by day-to-day objects. 


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imageWhere to meet next?

And any other time here at the Cloud Innovation Center in Naperville ; )

Thanks to Ted East, Andy Must and the team at CIC for their support, Karyn Homer and Rapport’s Ed Elkin and Sue White. And, once again, congratulating Warren Bent, Tom Costello and Carol Davids on another successful IIT Real Time Comms.